Ancient Warfare Magazine: Volume IV, Issue 3, Justinian's fireman: Belisarius and the Byzantine Empire

Ancient Warfare Magazine: Volume IV, Issue 3, Justinian's fireman: Belisarius and the Byzantine EmpireAncient Warfare Magazine: Volume IV, Issue 3, Justinian's fireman: Belisarius and the Byzantine Empire

This issue of Ancient Warfare magazine focuses on the life and times of Belisarius, one of the most talented generals to serve the Byzantine Empire, and a man who came close to restoring the Western Empire, lost to Barbarian invaders in the years just before his birth. We start with an historical introduction that covers his life, conquest and difficult relationship with the Emperor Justinian, and this is followed by five articles looking at his career in more depth.

This issue differs in a significant way from the previous one, on ancient siege warfare. In that case the themed articles looked at the same topic over a long period of time. Here the articles look at a short period of time, the career of Belisarius, but cover a wider range of topics. Belisarius and his achievements tend to be overlooked, coming after the 'fall of Rome' and the accepted end of the Roman Empire in the west. In fact he was able to recapture large parts of the old western Empire, including part of Spain, all of the lost territories in North Africa, Italy, and of course Rome herself.

As always there are several supporting articles not related to the main theme, in this case looking at the heavy darts used as a weapon in the late Roman Empire, the Theban Sacred Band, and the nature of linen armour.

This issue covers a very interesting period of late Roman history, and one that deserves to be better known.

Chapters
Secrets and Lies: Belisarius and the Anecdota of Procopius
A good general and lucky too: fortune as a factor in Belisarius's campaigns
Champions and Tradition: Single combat in the age of Belisarius
Defending the ancient capital: The long siege of Rome, AD 537-538
Source for a Handbook: Reflections of the Wars in the Strategicon and archaeology
Death from above: Mattiobarbuli and Plumbata
Special: Boeotian crack troops
The Debate: Don't stick on glued linen

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