A.E.G. G.III

The A.E.G. G.III was an improved version of the A.E.G. G.II, and was produced in small numbers before being replaced by the definitive A.E.G. G.IV.

A.E.G. began work on twin engined bombers early in 1915 with the G.I. This used their standard construction method, with a welded steel tube fuselage, wooden wing ribs and a fabric covering. It was powered by two 100hp engines mounted between the wings, and was badly underpowered. Only one was built before work moved onto the A.E.G. G.II. This introduced 150hp engines and could carry 441lb of bombs. Around sixteen were built in mid 1915.

The G.III saw another improvement in power, and used two 220hp Mercedes D.IV engines, then the most powerful engine in German service. Wingspan was increased. It could carry a 50% higher payload - up to 661lb, had a crew of three and was armed with two or three machine guns. It also introduced balanced control surfaces and integral radiators.

The G.III was produced in small numbers - no more than 45 from the overall run of 550 G series aircraft. It was followed late in 1916 by the A.E.G. G.IV, the most successful entry in the series.

The G.III was initially used as an escort fighter, but as with the G.II proved to be unsuited to this role. It then went to the bomber units. Amongst the units to operate it was Kampfgeschwader I, based in Macedonia, which was the first German air service unit to be entirely equipped with G type aircraft used as bombers. The G.III was in front line service from June 1916 until May 1917.

Engine: Two Mercedes D.IV engines
Power: 220hp each
Crew: 3
Span: 60ft 6in
Length: 30ft 2 1/4in
Empty weight: 4,268lb
Loaded weight: 6,633lb
Max speed: 98.75mph
Climb Rate: 6min to 3,280ft
Armament: two or three machine guns
Bomb load: 661lb

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How to cite this article: Rickard, J (9 March 2016), A.E.G. G.III , http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_AEG_GIII.html

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