Interdiction

To destroy an enemy's lines of communication and supply. In modern warfare normally applied to the use of deep strikes by combat aircraft or cruise missiles. The idea is to disrupt any enemy reinforcements and his overall view of the battlefield this forces him to react not act a key concept in modern strategy. The Airwar preceeding the 1990/91 Gulf War is a classic example of interdiction although the concept really came into being during the Second World War with the use of Blitzkrieg by the Germans and their use of Stuka dive bombers.
How to cite this article: Dugdale-Pointon, TDP. (5 February 2001), Interdiction, http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/concepts_interdiction.html

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